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Building Rapport with Improvement Teams – Step 5

How can we use the same language as our team members to develop rapport and accelerate the team’s success?

 

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, Lean, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Building Rapport with Improvement Teams – Step 4

Here’s how to build rapport with team members using their communication style: visual, auditory or kinesthetic.

Discover your communication style. Click here:

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, Lean, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

How To Create a Quality Improvement Poster

I go to many improvement conferences. Most of the improvement posters are long on text but short on quality tools.

If you’re going to submit an improvement story, use the tools of quality. Here’s how:

https://www.qimacros.com/pdf/How-To-Develop-A-Kick-Butt-Improvement-Poster.pdf

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Well, shoot! Looks like we missed each other!

It looks like you’ve clicked on a link to learn about signing up for a webinar that’s already happened.

 

No worries, you can click HERE to find out about the next live webinar…

or you can click HERE to view a webinar that’s been recorded.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Jay Arthur Blog, QI Macros.

Agile Software Project Story

Back when I was a software systems analyst for the phone company, my boss asked me to get requirements from one of our users. He thought it would take months to get the report he wanted. I did it in one day by using the right tool for the job. Here’s how:

 

Posted by Jay Arthur in Agile Lean Six Sigma, Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog, Lean, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Agile Electric Guitar Development

Frying Pan Guitar
In 1931, George Beauchamp combined a guitar with a microphone to create the first electric guitar called the “Frying Pan.” Without it, we wouldn’t have rock-and-roll, country and blues. This is how transitions begin, with a prototype that catapults transition to a new way of doing things.

Isn’t it time to start doing the same thing with Lean Six Sigma? Not amplification, but acceleration?

 

 

 

Register for the upcoming FREE QI Macros Live Webinar, happening August 14th, 2018 at 9:00a.m. MDT.

Learn more about it in the video below, and register at THIS link.

What:  FREE QI Macros – Lean Six Sigma SPC Software for Excel Webinar.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Agile Lean Six Sigma, Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog, Lean, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Agile Scaling Up In Corporations

HBR’s article on Agile At Scale predicts the future of business and Lean Six Sigma. Here’s what I learned:

 

Join my Agile Quality Improvement Movement. Sign up to receive Weekly Agile Six Sigma emails right in your inbox! Click HERE to subscribe.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Agile Lean Six Sigma, Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog, Lean, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Shift from Manufacturing to Supply Chain

The July-August, 2018 Inc. magazine has an article (pg. 22) about manufacturing vs supply chain service jobs. From 1999-2015:

  • Manufacturing jobs declined from 12.5 million to 8.2. Supply chain jobs increased from 13.4 million to 20.0.
  • Manufacturing salaries climbed only slightly from $54,800 to 59,800 while supply chain jobs rose from $72,600 to $85,200.

With increasing manufacturing automation, more jobs are being created around supporting production than actual production. Something to think about.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Lean, Manufacturing.

Agile Process Innovation

I’ve lived through Business Process Reengineering which often stumbled because it was impossible to take a complex system and “reengineer” it. The only method I’ve found that works consistently is Agile Process Innovation. Here’s how it works:

 

Join my Agile Quality Improvement Movement. Sign up to receive Weekly Agile Six Sigma emails right in your inbox! Click HERE to subscribe.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog, Lean, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Team Communication Costs

People often ask me, how big should an improvement team be? My answer: as small as possible.

In Fred Brooks’ Mythical Man Month, he points out that communication pathways increase in a nonlinear fashion. The formula is simple:

(n2-n)/2

Where n is the number of people on a team.

  • 2 people = 1 connection (4-2)/2
  • 3 people = 3 connections (9-3)/2
  • 4 people = 6 connections (16-4)/2
  • 5 people = 10 connections (25-5)/2
  • 6 people = 15 connections (36-6)/2
  • 7 people = 21 connections (49-7)/2

The bigger the team, the more time is spent on discussion and communication, not progress.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Lean, Six Sigma.