Lean Six Sigma – Lean Six Sigma Moneybelt

Improvement Insights Blog

Posts tagged "Lean Six Sigma"

*Next Free QI Macros Live Webinar: Tuesday, July 16th, 2024

Register for the upcoming FREE QI Macros Live Webinar, happening Tuesday, July 16th, 2024 at 9:00 a.m. MDT.

Learn more about it in the video below, and register at THIS link.



What:  FREE QI Macros – Lean Six Sigma SPC Software for Excel Webinar.

When: Tuesday, July 16th, 2024 at 9:00 a.m. MDT.

Where:  Join online from wherever you are.

How:  Register for the webinar HERE.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Data Mining, Excel, QI Macros, Webinar.

Zero to Hero

Is it possible to learn anything quickly? To go from Zero to Hero in just a few hours? Yes, I believe so. Here’s why:



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma for Hospitals” and QI Macros [software].

“I may have told this story before, but it bears repeating again. About eight years ago I was in Hawaii and I found out there was a free ukulele class next door taught by a guy named Jason: Jason Jerome [with] Lahaina Music. Now, Lahaina Music just burnt down [in the 2023 wildfires] but Jason is still teaching classes up and down West Maui.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.

Start With The Worst First

Don't waste time on simple problems. Start with the worst first!

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.

Agile Process Improvement Discovery at ASQ Lean Six Sigma Conference

I gave away copies of my Agile Process Innovation book at ASQ’s 2023 Lean Six Sigma conference. One recipient was a man from Norway who told me he “scoffed” at the idea of training people and getting results in a day or two. I was surprised when I saw him again at ASQ LSS 2024. I was even more surprised when he told me what he’d learned!



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma Demystified” and QI Macros [software]. I also wrote a book called “Agile Process Innovation.”

“I went to the American Society for Quality Lean Six Sigma conference back in February of 23 (so, over a year ago).

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.

Have You Got Jargon Monoxide?

Are you asphyxiating people with Jargon Monoxide? Maybe you need some oxygen language.



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma for Hospitals” and QI Macros [software].

“I ran across an interesting phrase and I loved it, it was great. They said, “Everybody suffers from… jargon monoxide.” (There, I finally said it!) Jargon monoxide: The asphyxiation through jargon.

“I think Six Sigma is burdened with it from the very start. The words “Six Sigma” make everybody blanch from the get-go. “Sigma? Oh my gosh, that’s statistical! I don’t underst… oh my gosh!” Right? They start to asphyxiate and can’t breathe.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog.

*Latest webinar: 5/7/24 QI Macros webinar

Over 40 people signed up for this webinar, with Jay Arthur demonstrating some of the software’s most frequently used tools and answering questions asked by attendees.

 



If you saw a feature demonstrated in the webinar that might have been added to QI Macros after the version you’re using (for instance, the Improvement Project Wizard or the automated Process Change Wizard), you may need to purchase an upgrade to bring your QI Macros to the current version.

Send an email to support@qimacros.com and we can help, for instance in generating a quote to upgrade all the users at your organization or just guiding you through the purchasing process.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Data Mining, Excel, QI Macros, Webinar.

You Don’t Really Learn QI/LSS in a Classroom

You don’t really Learn Quality Improvement or Lean Six Sigma in a classroom. Here’s why:



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma for Hospitals” and QI Macros [software].

“You know, I’ve discovered that you don’t really learn Quality Improvement in a classroom, you learn it afterwards. It’s more like an apprenticeship where you go out and start to try stuff and figure things out. If there’s somebody around, you get a little help with that. When I started, there was nobody around to help me with that, so I kind of stumbled for a while but then I figured it out.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.

What’s Your White Whale?

Are you afraid to tackle the biggest problem facing your company? Don’t be. Here’s why:



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma Demystified” and QI Macros [software].

“I have to admit I’ve never read Moby Dick. I’ve never gotten beyond ‘My name is Ishmael,’ but I think each one of us in our organization has a white whale. There’s some big hairy pressing problem that is so scary that we’re afraid to tackle it… afraid.

“Now, I’ll never forget when the head of Finance called me in and said “Postage costs have gone up $20 million this year.” I worked at US West, the phone company.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.

Eliminate the Failure Points of Quality Improvement

Ever noticed that some people struggle to learn Quality Improvement and Lean Six Sigma Here’s why:



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma Demystified” and QI Macros [software].

“I talked about Tim Ferriss’ approach to simplifying things. He also points out that in many situations when people are coming on board there are certain failure points: where do they fail? His cooking book is about having too complicated a recipe, or too many things that had to get done at the same time. So how do we make it up so that they don’t have that problem? How do we eliminate the failure points?

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.

Do as Little as Needed, Not as Much as Possible

Too many teams try to use every tool in the Six Sigma toolkit. It’s counterproductive. Here’s why:



“I’m Jay Arthur, author of “Lean Six Sigma for Hospitals” and QI Macros [software].

“For a number of years, I’ve been a fan of Tim Ferriss, the author of “The Four Hour Workweek.” In “The 4-Hour Chef,” he spends a whole chapter talking about how he takes a process, breaks it all down and makes it simple and easy to learn. One of the things that I found in there (and I’ll just read this, because it makes it a little easier for me), he says, “Do as little as needed, not as much as possible.”

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights.