Histogram
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Posts tagged "Histogram"

*Latest webinar: 11/6/19 QI Macros Webinar

More than 40 people signed up for this webinar, with Jay Arthur demonstrating how to use some of the useful features of QI Macros, as well as some of the new features introduced in recent releases of the software.

Some attendees were familiar with the software and already use it, some had only begun to use it; all were interested in learning new ways that QI Macros can help them with their Agile Lean Six Sigma and Quality Improvement efforts. (You can hear him answering questions and comments typed in by webinar attendees.)

 



If you saw a feature demonstrated in the webinar that might have been added to QI Macros after the version you’re using (for instance, the Templates Wizard or the automated Process Change Wizard), you may need to purchase an upgrade to bring your QI Macros to the current version.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Excel, QI Macros, Webinar.

Who Sets Your Specification Limits?

A QI Macros customer called to ask how he could figure out the specification limits to give him a Cp/Cpk of 1.33. What’s wrong with this question? The answer is obvious isn’t it?

Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, QI Macros, Six Sigma.

How to Craft an Improvement Story

In 1975, I went to work at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey. I was introduced to Unix and the Shell programming language. The cool thing about Shell was the hundreds of tools that each did simple things and could be cobbled together into scripts that would do amazingly complex things. I later wrote a book, Unix Shell Programming, that described my love affair with Shell.

Fast forward 20 years and I brought the same thinking that I’d learned from Unix Shell to Six Sigma. The QI Macros have hundreds of templates filled with a variety of worksheets to do many things.

Posted by Jay Arthur in QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Data Visualizations that Really Work

The June, 2016 HRB article by Scott Berinato examines how to use charts and diagrams to express ideas and statistics. I agree with Anmol Garg, Tesla data scientist quoted in the article, “You can’t find anything looking at spreadsheets and querying databases. It has to be visual.”

Bernato says: “Convenient is a tempting replacement for good, but it will lead to charts that are merely adequate or, worse, ineffective.” He separates visualizations into four components: idea generation, idea illustration, visual discovery and everyday dataviz. Simple line, bar and pie charts are great for idea generation and illustration, but terrible for visual discovery and dataviz.

Posted by Jay Arthur in QI Macros, Six Sigma, Statistics.