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Minimally Invasive Lean Six Sigma Training

One big pharma company embraced a more Agile approach to implementing Lean Six Sigma and achieved quick results. How did they do it?

Posted by Jay Arthur in Jay Arthur Blog.

Process Before Projects

You’ve heard the phrase “Cart before the horse?” Well One Agile company learned a similar phrase during their implementation. Save yourself a lot of time and effort by learning this simple phrase.


Posted by Jay Arthur in Improvement Insights, Jay Arthur Blog.

Xcel Energy Cuts The Power

Xcel left a message on our phone that we would “experience periodic electrical outages” because they are trying to conserve “natural gas usage due to cold weather.”

Can’t wait to reset all of our digital clocks.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Jay Arthur Blog.

It’s Hard to Do Data Analysis on Ugly Data… Part 2

People often get stuck before the “Analyze” phase of DMAIC because of ugly data.
You can’t analyze data until it is in the right format for analysis.

In this data about medications that might affect patient falls, we have to:

  1. Transpose the data
  2. Use Excel’s Text-to-column feature to split the meds into separate cells
  3. Use QI Macros UnStack Columns tool to get all of the meds into a single column
  4. Use QI Macros Data Mining Wizard to create a PivotTable and Pareto chart of medications involved in patient falls

You can watch the video below:

 

Posted by Jay Arthur in Data Mining, Improvement Insights.

DayMinder Typos

I use a small DayMinder monthly calendar.

I noticed that someone forgot to use spell check before it went to print. That must be expensive!

 

If you can’t spell the months correctly, how can I trust the rest of the calendar?

Posted by Jay Arthur in Six Sigma.

It’s Hard to Do Data Analysis on Ugly Data

I have found that people often get stuck before the Analyze phase of DMAIC because of ugly data.  You can’t analyze data until it is in the right format for analysis.

In this example of patient falls data, we have to:

  1. Transpose the data
  2. Use PivotTables to summarize the data
  3. Use a c Chart to plot the data.

Posted by Jay Arthur in Data Mining, Improvement Insights.

Measuring Six Sigma Success

This recent article talks about how GE measured Six Sigma success:

“Engineers and scientists were measured on how many Six Sigma projects they completed during the year.”

Since I know that 4% of the business is causing over half of the waste, rework and lost profit (the 4-50 rule), making everyone do “Six Sigma projects” is a form of overproduction (violating a Lean rule). It creates waste, rework and unhappy employees. It makes people put trivial improvements in Six Sigma format to achieve the goals.

Measure Six Sigma success by bottom-line, profit and productivity enhancing results, not projects. Use data to focus improvements to maximize results and minimize effort.

Posted by Jay Arthur in QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Lean Six Sigma Fundamentalists vs Revolutionaries

Lean Six Sigma Fundamentalists believe:
– Get management commitment
– Train lots of black and green belts
– Implement wall-to-wall floor to ceiling

Lean Six Sigma Revolutionaries believe:
-Engage informal leaders
-Train money belts
-Laser-focused, data-driven breakthrough improvements

Posted by Jay Arthur in QI Macros, Six Sigma.

Glitches are Opportunities

The next time you hit a glitch are you going to
0. Ignore it
1. Find a work around
2. Take heroic action to fix it.
3. Fix the glitch and then take the time to prevent it from ever happening again?

Posted by Jay Arthur in QI Macros, Six Sigma.

One-Third of Food is Lost or Wasted

As reported in the ISE magazine, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reported that “one third of food produced in the world is lost or wasted, which affects not only world hunger but carbon emission, water and land use.”

I was recently rereading Juran on Quality by Design (1992) in which Joseph Juran lists “high points” in the book. One that stood out for me: “In the United States about one third of what we do consists of redoing work previously “done.”

There it is again: ONE-THIRD of outputs are waste or rework. This number hasn’t changed in decades.

Posted by Jay Arthur in QI Macros, Six Sigma.